Archive for September, 2012

Shark Attack! – 5 Free Sea Life Amigurumi Patterns

Some stories are just too crazy to try to tell. Like that one with the underwater cave inhabited by the yellow-eyed octopus and the super heroes. Other stories, though, just have to be told, no matter how crazy.

This is one of those stories.

I was standing at my desk getting some papers ready for the FWF session next week when I heard a soft click come from behind me. Suddenly grand, dramatic music began playing, but at a rather subdued volume. I turned to see that a tiny white speaker hooked up to an even smaller media player had been propped up on the bookshelf at the other end of the room. And although this in itself was unusual, the thing next to the speaker on the bookshelf was what really threw me for a loop. There’s really no way to prepare yourself for this kind of thing either, I’ve found.

Sitting on the shelf was:

Sharkie! Free Pattern by Karissa Cole

He began singing and dancing to the music, with me as his sole audience. Surprisingly enough he could carry a tune, although his lyrics were a bit on the wonky side (but I was honestly too stunned to complain about such a triviality). When his short performance came to an end – with the lyric: Oh yes I am a shark, now you see/Please won’t you bring me some broccoli? – the dramatic music coming to a theatrical finish, he stared up at me expectantly, obviously waiting for some sort of response.

Well I’m sorry but I just don’t know the proper etiquette for this sort of thing. Which is something I suppose was blatantly obvious what with my just staring at him.

Finally he prompted, “What did you think?”

I groped around for the right thing to say, assuming “the right thing to say” even existed in a situation like this one. Eventually I settled on, “It was certainly interesting.” I attempted to smile politely, but I think it came off more as a grimace. The little shark didn’t seem to notice though; he just beamed brightly, pleased with the whole situation.

I knew I probably shouldn’t ask any questions. I mean, when a tiny shark comes into your house, sets up on your bookshelf and begins singing about broccoli, it’s probably just best to accept things the way they are and not probe too much. Leave well enough alone.

But I couldn’t help myself.

“Why are you signing?”

He smiled at me in that “duh” kind of way. “You know!” he guffawed. “Everyone knows sharks sing. Silly.” He shook his head, but in an amused, not perturbed way.

“Um,” I said tentatively. “I thought it was whales that sang.”

At that his little face twisted into the most peculiar combination of recognition and shock.

He slapped his fin to his head, muttering “Whales. Whales! Of COURSE, it’s WHALES that sing! Oh I knew that. Stupid, stupid. . .”

I smiled and tried to contain my giggling.

He looked up at me around his fin, a sheepish smile (if you can picture a shark smiling sheepishly) creeping onto his face. “So,” he started, brushing off his embarrassment. “Wanna play Monopoly? I’ll let you be the race car.” He lowered his fin and smiled up at me hopefully.

I couldn’t help but chuckle at the notion of playing a board game with a slightly confused but altogether pleasant mini shark, but I nodded readily.

I went off to get the game, stopping by the fridge for some broccoli on the way.

______________________________________________________________________

My Sharkie pattern came about soon after my whale pattern. Check it out here if you haven’t already. With these two patterns you can make your own aquarium! As a plus, see below for ideas for making your own seal, dolphin, goldfish, or orca. But to start, here’s how to make your own shark:

S U G G E S T E D  M A T E R I A L S:

• Worsted weight yarn in two (2) colors such as:
* Red Heart Super Saver (1) Grey  [Main color] (2) White [Secondary color]
• G/7 4.50MM crochet hook
• One (1) pair of 6MM safety eyes (available in many craft stores or online at http://www.crscrafts.com)
• Scissors
• Needle & black embroidery thread
• Fiberfill stuffing

A B B R E V I A T I O N S:

MC – magic circle (magic loop/magic ring)
sc – single crochet(s)
inc – increase
dec – decrease
st(s) – stitch(es)
ch – chain
*actions in asterisks should be repeated until round completion or to the indicated stopping point in the round*
(number in parentheses indicates total number of stitches after round/row completion)
FO – fasten off
RND – Round
tc – triple crochet
dc –  double crochet
hdc – half double crochet
sl st – slip stitch

T H E  P A T T E R N:

B O D Y (x1)

MC 6 with main color
RND 1) *inc* (12)
RND 2) *sc, inc* (18)
RND 3) *2sc, inc* (24)
RND 4-7) *sc* (24)
RND 8) switch to secondary color *sc* (24)
RND 9) *2sc, dec* (18) – Attach eyes. Stuff.
RND 10) *sc, dec* (12)
RND 11) *dec* (6)
FO

T A I L  F I N (x1)

ch 8
dc in third ch from hook, hdc, 2 sl st, hdc, dc in final ch, sc in same final chain. cut yarn and pull through. Shape and attach to back of shark (if you did not use a joggless color change method I suggest putting the tail were the colors change). As you can see I chose to put the tail on horizontally; this is not meant to be realistic, just cute in my opinion. Turn the tail and attach in so it’s more vertical if you prefer.

D O R S A L  F I N (x1)

Ch 8
tc in 4th ch from hook. dc in next ch. hdc in next ch. sc in next ch. sl st in last ch. FO. Attach.

F I N S (x2)

decide on placement and pick up a stitch on side of body. ch 4, sc in original pickup. FO. Repeat for other side of head/body.
ALTERNATIVE: If you’re not comfortable picking up and crocheting (or chaining in this case) simply ch 4 and sl st in last chain from hook. Attach to body.

Using the black thread, stitch on gills.

Shark Angles by Karissa Cole

 

You can use the base shark or whale pattern to make other sea critters. Just make the changes listed for each below:

 

To make an Orca: (1) Follow the same body, fin, dorsal fin, and tail pattern as shark using black instead of grey. (2) Instead of using black thread for gills, use white thread (or yarn) to stitch on eye patches.

Orca Free Amigurumi Pattern by Karissa Cole

To make a Dolphin: (1) Follow the same fin, dorsal fin, and tail pattern as shark using blue-grey instead of grey. MAKE THE FOLLOWING ADJUSTMENT TO THE BODY: Instead of changing to the secondary color in RND 8, wait and switch in RND 9 (a decrease row.) (2) To make the nose/snout:

With main dolphin color, MC 3
RND 1) *inc* (6)
RND 2) *sc* (6)
FO. Attach to head and adjust eyes accordingly.

Dolphin by Karissa Cole (2)

To make a Seal: (1) Follow the same body, fin, and tail pattern as shark using white instead of grey (skip the dorsal fin, just as in the original whale pattern). (2) Using black thread or yarn stitch on a nose.

Baby Seal by Karissa Cole

To make a Goldfish: (1) Follow the same body and tail pattern as shark using orange instead of grey. (2) Stitch the top fin as follows:

Ch 3
sl st in 2nd ch from hook.
dc, tr cr, & then dc all in next ch.
sl st in last ch. FO.

(3) Stitch the side fin the same way noted in the shark/whale base pattern but make the following changes: Pick up stitch on side of head/body, double up yarn, ch 3, sc in original pick up, FO.

Goldfish by Karissa Cole

** Please be sure to note, though, that these are original designs and patterns. I believe in the free sharing of techniques and ideas. Please do not abuse my desire to share with others. You are not permitted to sell any products made as the result of these patterns and/or designs, nor are you permitted to sell the patterns or designs. Please, if you do use the patterns or designs for either the shark, whale, orca, dolphin, or fish in any part, give credit where credit is due: direct others to this original posting so that they too can benefit.**

Pattern, design, photos, and story copyright Karissa Cole 2012. All rights reserved.

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Can You Stare Like a Whale? – Free Pattern

Free Whale Amigurumi Pattern by Karissa Cole

On some sad, gloomy days I sometimes find myself wishing my life were a bit more interesting, with more excitement and surprises.

But then I inevitably come home from grocery shopping to find two blue whales staring intently at each other on my kitchen table and I realize I’m really quite full up in the interesting, exciting, surprise department.

Well, actually, today was the first time that exact scenario played out. But I’ve come to find there’s always something unusual lurking around the next corner in my week. This week it just happened to be whales.

It went like I said after running errands: Juggling two jumbo brown bags I fumbled with my keys and somehow managed to let myself in the front door without dropping anything. I walked in the house, kicked the door shut behind me, doing good maintaining my balance – at least until  I saw two miniscule sea creatures sitting right in front of my salt and pepper shakers. I didn’t bother to check to see if I broke the eggs or smushed the bread when I dropped my bags; I was too interested and spellbound by what I saw.

At first it looked like these two whales were kissing, and I almost thought to turn away and give them some privacy. When I made just the slightest mention of it, though, the whale on the left scoffed, and quickly explained that the two were immersed in a staring contest. I nodded thoughtfully at that notion, mulling it over, until I realized they were totally without water. Panicking I raced over to the sink, mumbling something about letting an endangered species suffocate in my own kitchen. Apparently these little guys have good hearing though, as the whale on the right – gaze never leaving his opponent –  politely explained that although whales live in the water, they breathe air and were perfectly fine. I could feel my face flush when I realized my silly mistake – “everyone knows how whales breathe doofus” – , and then flush even more when I thought about the fact that I was embarrassed in front of a whale in the first place.

A new set of questions and concerns hit me then – like, “how did you guys get on my table and how is it you can speak English?” – but I walked quietly back toward the table and, holding my breath, watched the staring match continue.

It felt like an eternity before another word was uttered. Finally, the whale on the left asked me what time it was. When I told him he let out a slow whistle. “Best time yet, Peapod!”  he exclaimed. At that both whales let each other out of their attention and turned toward me, with no apparent winner to their battle. When I questioned who had won, they simply stared at me with perplexed expressions. I explained that usually, in a staring contest, whomever blinks first is the loser, leaving the other player the winner. They both laughed lightly at that, saying something about how silly some bipeds can be.

I brushed it off and decided to see if I could get some answers to more pertinent questions. Before I managed to open my mouth, though, a third, darker colored whale came bounding – if you can say a whale can bound, that is – over to us. “Dudes!” he yelled in what I would have before today called a very unwhalelike manner. “The popcorn is getting cold. You coming?” He then turned to me directly, gave a quick, friendly wave of his fin, and told me that he already picked out a movie for all four of us to watch.

The first two whales sprung up and made their way to the next room where the TV had somehow been set up to play Finding Nemo.I hurried to put away my groceries as they called excitedly, imploring to me come watch. As I flopped down onto the couch the third whale gently nudged the remote to me as the other two made themselves totally comfortable on my lap, settling in for a nice evening.

Although I was still curious about how they got here and all that, I decided not to bother with trivialities. I figure why question a good thing? I mean, I had after all just gotten three new friends, who cares how?

Peapod, the lightest blue whale, is sweet and considerate; Park, the medium shade, is competitive but still caring. And Schmoo, the darkest of the whales, is an all around goofball. And apparently they have a thing for tennis, card games, and fondu. And they’ve also proven to be great at telling jokes and keeping things interesting.  So it looks like with these guys around I won’t need to be wishing for a more interesting life, with more excitement and more surprises. They’ll keep me covered for a bit.

Funny how things work out like that sometimes, huh?

2 Whales by Karissa Cole

I decided to make some little amigurumi whales because, after looking through all my designs thus far, I saw that I hadn’t used any of my blue yarn. So I grabbed my hook and a skein of blue and started crocheting. And the micro whale pattern was born! I kept it simple to pander to my own short attention span. With such an easy pattern I can start and finish one of these whales in about a half hour.

I’m not about to hog all the whale love though. Here’s how to make your own:

S U G G E S T E D  M A T E R I A L S:

• Worsted weight yarn in two (2) colors such as:
* Red Heart Super Saver (1) Blue  [Main color] (2) White [Secondary color]
• G/7 4.50MM crochet hook
• One (1) pair of 6MM safety eyes (available in many craft stores or online at http://www.crscrafts.com)
• Scissors
• Needle & thread
• Fiberfill stuffing

A B B R E V I A T I O N S:

MC – magic circle (magic loop/magic ring)
sc – single crochet(s)
inc – increase
dec – decrease
st(s) – stitch(es)
ch – chain
*actions in asterisks should be repeated until round completion or to the indicated stopping point in the round*
(number in parentheses indicates total number of stitches after round/row completion)
FO – fasten off
RND – Round
dc –  double crochet
hdc – half double crochet
sl st – slip stitch

T H E  P A T T E R N:

B O D Y (x1)

MC 6 with main color
RND 1) *inc* (12)
RND 2) *sc, inc* (18)
RND 3) *2sc, inc* (24)
RND 4-7) *sc* (24)
RND 8) switch to secondary color *sc* (24)
RND 9) *2sc, dec* (18) – Attach eyes. Stuff.
RND 10) *sc, dec* (12)
RND 11) *dec* (6)
FO

T A I L  F I N (x1)

ch 8
dc in third ch from hook, hdc, 2 sl st, hdc, dc in final ch, sc in same final chain. cut yarn and pull through. Shape and attach to back of whale (if you did not use a joggless color change method I suggest putting the tail were the colors change)

F I N S (x2)

decide on placement and pick up a stitch on side of body. ch 4, sc in original pickup. FO. Repeat for other side of head.
ALTERNATIVE: If you’re not comfortable picking up and crocheting (or chaining in this case) simply ch 4 and sl st in last chain from hook. Attach to body.

2 (2) Whales by Karissa Cole

Also be sure to check out the Sharkie pattern!

** Please be sure to note, though, that these are original designs and patterns. I believe in the free sharing of techniques and ideas. Please do not abuse my desire to share with others. You are not permitted to sell any products made as the result of these patterns and/or designs, nor are you permitted to sell the patterns or designs. Please, if you do use the patterns or designs for either the shark, whale, orca, dolphin, or fish in any part, give credit where credit is due by directing others to this original post. **

 

Pattern, design, photos, and story copyright Karissa Cole 2012. All rights reserved.

Homework

Such Gossip by Karissa Cole

Today was a fun day. One of the highlights was climbing onto the roof to repaint the dormer. That was a first for me.

Most of my day was spent outside repainting and helping with roof repair. I think it was when I was standing on the ladder at some point that I got the idea to take a mini nature walk in my own little backyard, see what I can see.

I know that a lot of the stuff I photographed is considered ordinary (and in the case of the weeds and the ‘shrooms, even nuisances to some) but there’s something about looking at it all through a camera lens; none of it’s really garden variety to me.

Hibernate by Karissa Cole

I thought the mushrooms came out kind of neat. There are just a few of them in the backyard and you actually wouldn’t even know they were there if you weren’t looking. Funny how fungus can fascinate me so. . . Although there are some seriously awesome mushrooms out there, you know? As of today it has become my personal mission to photograph them all. I should get cracking.

Oh, Fractal Me

Dance of the Butterflies by Karissa Cole exastris1701

Of an Enchanted Forest by Karissa

the Meeting of the Wheels exastris1701 wp

It occurred to me I hadn’t done much work in Apophysis 7x (see this article for info about the program) lately. Granted, this is mostly because the 5-hour renders eat away at my frail, old, hopelessly outdated laptop. But as one of the first digital art forms I took up, I felt I really ought to shake the dust off the 7x icon that usually sits idly in my program files and see what I could come up with, even if my computer put up a fuss.

I had a few spare minutes today to input the parameters for the three above images. Admittedly, these itty bitty previews don’t do too much justice to the full size pieces (especially this last one, which looks a whole lot sharper when seen right). But whatchyagonnado.

I’m thinking I’ll tweak them a little bit, then release the wallpaper sizes. When I get another spare minute that is. Between writing new amigurumi patterns (got a whole slew of those coming soon!), staging new photo shoots, brushing up on my PS skills and making new pieces of celestial art, and work which just started up again yesterday, I’m swamped!

But I’m happy swamped, so it’s all good. And kind of prolific. Cool.

Soft Sight

‘The eyes are the window to the soul’

Bleh.

Sounds too poetic for an analytic brain like mine to be totally down with. Eyes can be really expressive though, so maybe it’s true. I couldn’t say. But I can say they can make interesting photographic subjects. Unfortunately the eyes I keep suffed in a jar in the closet don’t photograph that well, so I had to try my own.

Soft Sight (1) by Karissa Cole

Admittedly I feel a bit vain in uploading this. But I’m all alone today, so I had nobody to lend me their eyes for the afternoon. Besides, now that I think of it, this might be the only picture of myself (or, erm, part of myself) I’ve ever uploaded to my own blog.

If I had photoed someone else things might’ve come out better. It must have been one heck of a funny sight, seeing me twist to try to get a somewhat in-focus shot. Could’ve been worse though. And at the least it was . . .  well. . . practice, I guess.

Me and my green eyes. I think there’s possibility in them. Or at least, that’s what I see with them.

Purploids, and Pinkloids, and Bloops (oh my) – 3 Free Patterns

Created somewhat on whim and without excess thought, these are my three simplest patterns. If you’re a speedy yarner you can easily get all three done in one afternoon.

Oh My! - 3 free patterns by Karissa Cole

These were all actually prototypes, but they’re still fun stash buster projects. Enjoy! ( And as always feel free to contact with any questions; I will throughout this week be retesting all three patterns and instructions to make sure they work as they should, but if you find something that doesn’t make sense, just let me know :] )

S U G G E S T E D  M A T E R I A L S:

• Worsted weight yarn
• G/7 4.50MM crochet hook
• Two pairs of 8MM safety eyes (One pair for the Bloop, one for the Pinkloid) & One pair of 9mm eyes (Purploid)
• Scissors
• Needle & thread AND/OR Hot glue
• Fiberfill stuffing

A B B R E V I A T I O N S:

MC – magic circle (magic loop/magic ring)
sc – single crochet(s)
hdc – half-double crochet(s)
inc – increase
dec – decrease
sl st –  slip stitch
st(s) – stitch(es)
ch – chain
*actions in asterisks should be repeated until round completion or to the indicated stopping point in the round*
(number in parentheses indicates total number of stitches after round/row completion)
FO – fasten off
RND – Round
RW – Row
IBL – in back loops

P U R P L O I D  B A B Y  P A T T E R N

Purploid Baby Pattern by Karissa Cole

Often appearing out of nowhere, Purploids signal their startling arrival by staring intently at you – whether you know it or not. About a week ago I found this out, rather late at night. I soon realized this is just how they size a person up though. Once they’ve decided they like you they’re quite sweet, very protective and excellent sources of good advice. More people could do with a Purploid baby for a friend, but unfortunately so many people are too busy and serious they never even notice when a Purploid has come to visit them. Two Purploids showed up at my door yesterday after have been dejected and let me tell you, a sad Purploid is a heart-wrenching thing to witness.

Raise Purploid awareness: they have feelings too!

B O D Y (x1) (Follow this pattern for a baby Purploid [use 10mm eyes to really sell the itty bitty little one effect]. For a grown-up Purploid add a row between RNDs 7 & 8 and 11 & 12 and use the 9mm eyes.)

MC 6)
RND 1) *inc* (12)
RND 2) *sc, inc* (18)
RND 3) *2sc, inc* (24)
RND 4-7) *sc* (24)
RND 8) *3sc, inc* (30)
RND 9) *4sc, inc* (36)
RND 10) *sc* (36)
RND 11) *4sc, dec* (30)
RND 12) *3sc, dec* (24)
RND 13) *2sc, dec* (18)
Attach eyes and antennae (to make antennae simply chain 4, cut yarn leaving long tail, and pull through. Attach to head and fray long yarn tail). Stuff.
RND 14) *sc, dec* (12)
RND 15) *dec* (6)
FO

 

***ALTERNATE*** Some pattern users have had trouble getting the Purploid shape to come out right. I’m not sure why this is, but I suspect there’s some difference in tensions and materials (I crochet very, very tightly sometimes >.<). Although I have not recently tested the following variation, for a shorter Purploid (such as the one pictured) you could try using this pattern instead:

MC 6)
RND 1) *inc* (12)
RND 2) *sc, inc* (18)
RND 3) *2sc, inc* (24)
RND 4-5) *sc* (24)
RND 6) *3sc, inc* (30)
RND 7) *4sc, inc* (36)
RND 8) *sc* (36)
RND 9) *4sc, dec* (30)
RND 10) *3sc, dec* (24)
RND 11) *2sc, dec* (18)
Attach eyes and antennae (to make antennae simply chain 4, cut yarn leaving long tail, and pull through. Attach to head and fray long yarn tail). Stuff.
RND 12) *sc, dec* (12)
RND 13) *dec* (6)
FO

F E E T (x2)

MC 5
RND 1) *inc* (10)
RND 2-5) *sc* (10)
RND 6) *dec* (5)
FO

A R M S (x2)

(You may wish to try doubling your yarn for this, depending on the weight)
Ch 2
3 hdc in second ch from hook
FO
Attach to side of head

(For experienced ami makers I recommend simply picking up and crocheting this directly to the side of the head for that no-sew ease.)

I feel I should note these may not exactly look like “arms.” I’ve had ’em called gils or ears, but I figured arms was more descriptive for a pattern than “funny looking things on side of head.” :]

OPTIONAL:

The original Purploid was freeformed and gifted so this version is just slightly different. For instance, the first incarnation boasted a long tail with a pop-pom on the end. To make this for your Purploid: Ch 21, starting in second chain from hook sc 20; attach to body; make pop-pom (see Melvin post for brief written tutorial for pop-pom creation); attach pom to tail.

After you attach all the body parts (mainly the feet) your Purploid should be good to go!

P I N K L O I D  P O D L I N G  P A T T E R N

Pinkloid Podling Pattern by Karissa Cole 2

Pinkloid Podling Pattern by Karissa Cole

While most Pinkloids are pink (just as most Purploids are purple) this is not always the case. Red, orange, and even brown Pinkloids abound. Many people don’t realize this though, and usually assume Pinkloids are all pink. This is a common misconception, but Pinkloids tend to become very defensive about their color if they happen to exhibit a different hue than what their name suggests. I suppose this is why Pinkloids seem to relate to ladybugs quite well; ladybugs know all about being misjudged because of their name.

Still, Pinkloids don’t hold too much of a grudge. They’ll just brush it off and get straight back to work.

What is it Pinkloids do for work?

Well, they’re Word Sprites, of course. Have you ever been trying to say something, but you can’t find the right word, or it’s right on the tip of your tongue, you just can’t seem to get it out? Pinkloids are the ones who come along when this happens. They bring along the missing word and fling it into the conversation before it’s too late. Of course, occasionally a Pinkloid doesn’t make it in time, or perhaps they accidentally brought the wrong word, or maybe even too many Pinkloids converged at once and they all tried to use the word they each brought which causes things like “Haflapple” and “Splonge” to come tumbling out of a person’s mouth. But with all the people out there forgetting words – or worse, using the wrong words –  Pinkloids are kept very busy, so it’s no wonder they can’t always get it just right; they try their best though. And the funny thing is, thousands of people have encountered Pinkloids and didn’t even realize it.

To make your very own Pinkloid Podling:

B O D Y (x1)

MC 6
RND 1) *inc* (12)
RND 2) *sc, inc* (18)
RND 3) *2sc, inc* (24)
RND 4) *3sc, inc* (30)
RND 5-9) *sc* (30)
RND 10) *3sc, dec* (24)
RND 11) *2sc, dec* (18)
RND 12) *sc, dec* (12)
Attach eyes. Stuff.
RND 13) *dec* (6)
FO

W I N G S (x2)
Worked back and  forth. Always start in second chain from hook.

Ch 6
RW 1) 5sc, turn, ch 1
RW 2) 5sc, turn, chain 5
RW 3) Including the 5 ch you just made and the 5sc you should be able to work 9sc in this row. So do that. Then turn and ch 1
RW 4) 9sc, turn, ch 4
RW 5) Working with the 9sc and the 4 ch, sc across (this should be 12 sts)
FO

With a contrasting color, crochet along the bottom edges of the wings. (I recommend going totally bananas with the color here; I only had pink on hand, but it’d be fun to make some really wild color combos here!)

F E E T (x2)

MC 6
RND 1) *inc* (12)
RND 2) *2sc, inc* (16)
RND 3) *sc* (16)
RND 4) 6dec, 4sc (10)
RND 5) 3dec, 4sc (7)
RND 6-9) *sc* (7)
FO

A N T E N N A E (x2)

Ch 7
3hdc in second ch from hook
sl st in remainder of chains. cut yarn (leave long enough tail to sew to head).

See photos for suggested positioning and attach all the pieces. . . sort of like Mister Potato Head. . .

P O C K E T  B L O O P  P A T T E R N

Purploids are great to go to for advice, Pinkloids are masters of the Right Words, so what is it Bloops do, you may ask?

Typically they steal fresh laundry and try to nest in it.

Pocket Bloop Pattern by Karissa Cole

B O D Y (x1)

MC 6
RND 1) *inc* (12)
RND 2) *sc, inc* (18)
RND 3) *2sc, inc* (24)
RND 4-6) *sc* (24)
RND 7) *3sc, inc* (30)
RND 8-9) *sc* (30)
RND 10) *3sc, dec* (24)
RND 11) *sc* (24)
RND 12) *IBL sc* (24)
RND 13) *2sc, dec* (18)
Attach eyes. Stuff.
RND 14) *sc, dec* (12)
RND 15) *dec* (6)
FO

F E E T (x2)

MC 6
RND 1) *inc* (12)
RND 2) *IBL sc* (12)
FO

A N T E N N A E (x2)

Ch 10
RW 1) starting in second chain from hook, sc 9
FO

See photos for suggested positioning.

And there you go!

Simple though these are, they’re pretty fun and cute each in their own way.

**P L E A S E  N O T E** These are original designs and patterns. I believe in the free sharing of techniques and ideas. Please do not abuse my desire to share with others. You are not permitted to sell any products made as the result of these patterns (in part or in whole) and/or designs, nor are you permitted to sell the patterns or designs. Please, if you do use these patterns or designs, give credit where credit is due: direct others to this original posting so that they too can benefit.**

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Directory with Links to Free Crochet Patterns

Once Upon a Yarn

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Awesome Wallpapers

Hand-Picked, High-Quality Widescreen Walls

Best of Crochet

Sharing the most awesome crochet ideas!

ea1701

art and design (and other stuff, too)

Karissa Cole Design Portfolio

I have a brain and I'm not afraid to use it